Annotations

Installation

If you have changed the top-level namespace to something like 'MyCompany', then you would use the new namespace instead of 'App'.

Begin by installing this package through Composer. Run the following from the terminal:

composer require "laravelcollective/annotations":"^5.3.0"

Once composer is done, you'll need to create a Service Provider in app/Providers/AnnotationsServiceProvider.php.

<?php namespace App\Providers;

use Collective\Annotations\AnnotationsServiceProvider as ServiceProvider;

class AnnotationsServiceProvider extends ServiceProvider {

    /**
     * The classes to scan for event annotations.
     *
     * @var array
     */
    protected $scanEvents = [];

    /**
     * The classes to scan for route annotations.
     *
     * @var array
     */
    protected $scanRoutes = [];

    /**
     * The classes to scan for model annotations.
     *
     * @var array
     */
    protected $scanModels = [];

    /**
     * Determines if we will auto-scan in the local environment.
     *
     * @var bool
     */
    protected $scanWhenLocal = false;

    /**
     * Determines whether or not to automatically scan the controllers
     * directory (App\Http\Controllers) for routes
     *
     * @var bool
     */
    protected $scanControllers = false;

    /**
     * Determines whether or not to automatically scan all namespaced
     * classes for event, route, and model annotations.
     *
     * @var bool
     */
    protected $scanEverything = false;

}

Finally, add your new provider to the providers array of config/app.php:

  'providers' => [
    // ...
    App\Providers\AnnotationsServiceProvider::class
    // ...
  ];

Setting up Scanning

Add event handler classes to the protected $scanEvents array to scan for event annotations.

    /**
     * The classes to scan for event annotations.
     *
     * @var array
     */
    protected $scanEvents = [
      App\Handlers\Events\MailHandler::class,
    ];

Add controllers to the protected $scanRoutes array to scan for route annotations.

    /**
     * The classes to scan for route annotations.
     *
     * @var array
     */
    protected $scanRoutes = [
      App\Http\Controllers\HomeController::class,
    ];

Add models to the protected $scanModels array to scan for model annotations.

    /**
     * The classes to scan for model annotations.
     *
     * @var array
     */
    protected $scanModels = [
      'App\User',
    ];

Alternatively, you can set protected $scanEverything to true to automatically scan all classes within your application's namespace. Note: This may increase the time required to execute the scanners, depending on the size of your application.

Scanning your event handlers, controllers, and models can be done manually by using php artisan event:scan, php artisan route:scan, or php artisan model:scan respectively. In the local environment, you can scan them automatically by setting protected $scanWhenLocal = true.

Event Annotations

@Hears

The @Hears annotation registers an event listener for a particular event. Annotating any method with @Hears("SomeEventName") will register an event listener that will call that method when the SomeEventName event is fired.

<?php namespace App\Handlers\Events;

use App\User;

class MailHandler {

  /**
   * Send welcome email to User
   * @Hears("UserWasRegistered")
   */
  public function sendWelcomeEmail(User $user)
  {
    // send welcome email to $user
  }

}

Route Annotations

Route annotations can be incredibly powerful, however the order of your route definitions can impact how your application matches specific routes, specifically any wildcard routes. If protected $scanEverything is set to true, you will have no control over the order of your route definitions.

@Get

The @Get annotation registeres a route for an HTTP GET request.

<?php namespace App\Http\Controllers;

class HomeController {

  /**
   * Show the Index Page
   * @Get("/")
   */
  public function getIndex()
  {
    return view('index');
  }

}

You can also set up route names.

  /**
   * @Get("/", as="index")
   */

... or middlewares.

  /**
   * @Get("/", middleware="guest")
   */

... or both.

  /**
   * @Get("/", as="index", middleware="guest")
   */

Here's an example that uses all of the available parameters for a @Get annotation:

  /**
   * @Get("/profiles/{id}", as="profiles.show", middleware="guest", domain="foo.com", where={"id": "[0-9]+"})
   */

@Post, @Options, @Put, @Patch, @Delete, @any

The @Post, @Options, @Put, @Patch, @Delete, and @Any annotations have the exact same syntax as the @Get annotation, except it will register a route for the respective HTTP verb, as opposed to the GET verb.

@Middleware

As well as defining middleware inline in the route definition tags (@Get, @Post, etc.), the @Middleware tag can be used on its own. It works both individual methods:

  /**
   * Show the Login Page
   *
   * @Get("login")
   * @Middleware("guest")
   */
  public function login()
  {
    return view('index');
  }

Or on a whole controller, with the same only/exclude filter syntax that you can use elsewhere in laravel:

/**
 * @Middleware("guest", except={"logout"})
 */
class AuthController extends Controller {

  /**
   * Log the user out.
   *
   * @Get("logout", as="logout")
   * @Middleware("auth")
   *
   * @return Response
   */
  public function logout()
  {
    $this->auth->logout();

    return redirect( route('login') );
  }

}

@Resource

Using the @Resource annotation on a controller allows you to easily set up a Resource Controller.

<?php
/**
 * @Resource('users')
 */
class UsersController extends Controller {
  // index(), create(), store(), show($id), edit($id), update($id), destroy($id)
}

You can specify the only and except arguments, just like you can with the regular Route::resource() command.

  /**
   * @Resource('users', only={"index", "show"})
   */

You can also specify the route names of each resource method.

  /**
   * @Resource('users', names={"index"="user.all", "show"="user.view"})
   */

@Controller

Using the @Controller annotation on a controller allows you to set various options for the routes contained in it:

<?php
/**
 * @Controller(prefix="admin", domain="foo.com")
 */
class AdminController extends Controller {
  // All routes will be prefixed by admin/
}

Scan the Controllers Directory

To recursively scan the entire controllers namespace ( App\Http\Controllers ), you can set the $scanControllers flag to true.

It will automatically adjust App to your app's namespace.

    $scanControllers = true;

Advanced

If you want to use any logic to add classes to the list to scan, you can override the routeScans() or eventScans() methods.

The following is an example of adding a controller to the scan list if the current environment is local:

public function routeScans() {
    $classes = parent::routeScans();

    if ( $this->app->environment('local') ) {
        $classes = array_merge($classes, [App\Http\Controllers\LocalOnlyController::class]);
    }

    return $classes;
}

Scanning Namespaces

You can use the getClassesFromNamespace( $namespace ) method to recursively add namespaces to the list. This will scan the given namespace. It only works for classes in the app directory, and relies on the PSR-4 namespacing standard.

This is what the $scanControllers flag uses with the controllers directory.

Here is an example that builds on the last one - adding a whole local-only namespace.

public function routeScans() {
    $classes = parent::routeScans();

    if ( $this->app->environment('local') ) {
    {
        $classes = array_merge(
            $classes,
            $this->getClassesFromNamespace( App\Http\Controllers\Local::class )
        );
    }

    return $classes;
}

Model Annotations

You can use annotations to automatically bind your models to route parameters, using Route Model Binding. To do this, use the @Bind annotation.

/**
 * @Bind("users")
 */
class User extends Eloquent {
  //
}

This is the equivalent of calling Route::model('users', 'App\Users').

Custom Annotations

If you want to register your own annotations, create a namespace containing subclasses of Collective\Annotations\Routing\Annotations\Annotations\Annotation - let's say App\Http\Annotations.

Then, in your annotations service provider, override the addRoutingAnnotations( RouteScanner $scanner ) method, and register your routing annotations namespace:

<?php namespace App\Providers;

use Collective\Annotations\Routing\Annotations\Scanner as RouteScanner;

/* ... then, in the class definition ... */

    /**
     * Add annotation classes to the route scanner
     *
     * @param RouteScanner $namespace
     */
    public function addRoutingAnnotations( RouteScanner $scanner )
    {
      $scanner->addAnnotationNamespace( 'App\Http\Annotations' );
    }

Your annotation classes must must have the @Annotation class annotation (see the following example).

There is an equivalent method for event annotations: addEventAnnotations( EventScanner $scanner ).

Custom Annotation Example

Here is an example to make an @Auth annotation. It provides the same functionality as using the annotation @Middleware("auth").

In a namespace - in this example, App\Annotations:

<?php namespace App\Http\Annotations;

use Collective\Annotations\Routing\Annotations\Annotations\Annotation;
use Collective\Annotations\Routing\Annotations\MethodEndpoint;
use ReflectionMethod;

/**
 * @Annotation
 */
class Auth extends Annotation {

  /**
   * {@inheritdoc}
   */
  public function modify(MethodEndpoint $endpoint, ReflectionMethod $method)
  {
    if ($endpoint->hasPaths())
    {
      foreach ($endpoint->getPaths() as $path)
      {
        $path->middleware = array_merge($path->middleware, (array) 'auth');
      }
    }
    else
    {
      $endpoint->middleware = array_merge($endpoint->middleware, (array) 'auth');
    }
  }

}